Wednesday, April 16, 2014

It's Supposed To Be Fun.





It's Supposed To Be Fun


Some people need to cheer up.

   Sometimes I think that our fly fishing community has lost its sense of humor. I'm not sure how it happens that people can find their way into the game, at any age, and find some kind of pleasure or solace in the quiet arts of fly fishing, and yet at some point they become serious about it. Way too serious. Maybe this is just an aspect of human nature, to make things more complicated than they have to be. Perhaps there is some evolutionary advantage to this behavior. Is there an advantage for the more cerebral and complex individuals to out compete the more emotional members of the species? I don't know. I can see this working out just fine in the executive suites and corporate boardrooms, where the smarter you are the bigger the piece of pie you get. Maybe not so much when it comes to the hunters and gatherers though. I suspect that this is more of a "male" or masculine feature among fly fishers. And certainly any time that you mix ego and testosterone into anything, the process has a way of going awry.


This man is having more fun than you are.

   There is an observable pattern to this tendency. And while I dislike stereotypes in general, I have had many occasions to witness certain "types" of anglers during our time on the water together. One thing that I see is that the men are entirely too worried about how they "look", all of the time, while fly fishing. Aside from wearing all of the right attire and logos, carrying the latest in gear and accessories, and certainly the latest in rods, and looking picture perfect, there is a kind of man on the water these days who can't seem to relax. And for men it isn't the fashion statement so much as it is the terrible sense of self conscious concern that someone may be watching them, and they have a need to look cool. Often these men are inconsolable. In contrast a woman angler can come out for the day of fishing with her husband, and some of them are dressed to kill as well, and yet they seem unconcerned with their appearance, and they focus on the fishing. If I compliment  a woman on her fly fishing attire at the beginning of the trip, she is appropriately, briefly flattered. Should I share a similar compliment with the man it may actually make him uncomfortable. But the big difference is that the woman will go on to have a great time for the day, and the man will often be kind of uptight. All day. He has a need to perform, to prove himself, and to catch fish. It would help if he could cast. A good caster will look really cool out there no matter what he is wearing. No amount of state of the art fabric outdoors fashion clothing, or high end, technical assault fly rods, can make a bad caster look cool. Trust me. Sometimes it's like watching paint dry.


This man is not concerned with his appearance, and he is an expert fly fisherman.
 
      It always seemed kind of odd to me that a guy would spend a few thousand dollars on fly fishing clothing, tackle, accessories, and take some very expensive fly fishing travel trips as well, and yet not spend any time or money on learning how to fly cast. And so they attempt to teach themselves, often with poor results. And their fishing isn't what it could be as far as satisfaction and fun. I see this as an particularly American male trait- that somehow we men are born with certain pre-programmed skills: handling money, driving a car, shooting guns, sex and fly casting. I suspect that technology plays a role in this as well, or our over dependence on it.  There is an "App" for everything after all. And it's not hard to imagine that there is someone out there right now, with a fly rod in one hand and a Smart Phone in the other, going stroke for stroke with some engineered, robotic fly casting program, undoubtedly chanting "10-2 . . .10-2 . . .10-2". . . And still getting it wrong. Some things can not be learned from staring at a screen. Don't feel bad- You didn't really learn anything about sex from reading your old man's Playboy magazines and practicing on your own with that either.

   It's not too late for you! There is hope! You can change! 



First, let us kill all of the telephones!

   It takes a little commitment and willingness, and you have to want to change. But imagine being free of those nasty little "wind knots" forming in your leader, even when there is no wind. Wouldn't it be nice to not lose so many flies on the back cast? Wouldn't you like to be able to haul and shoot the fly line, and accurately place the fly without struggling to do it? I promise you that this is possible and achievable, often with just a few compassionate lessons. And with a little effort and practice you could be looking very cool indeed. And then your fly fishing life will be what it should be and ought to be- Fun.

   Trust me, I'm a professional! I teach fly casting for all levels of ability, from beginner to expert. I can work with you to help you overcome casting flaws and improve your game. Spring is the time to get your casting skills honed for the season ahead. You probably don't need a new fly line as badly as you need some good coaching and support.

Professional, Certified fly casting instruction for individuals and groups. Call or write for details. 

  Olympic Peninsula Fly Fishing Guide  
  Sea-run Coastal Cutthroat Trout, Trout, Summer Steelhead 
  Catch and Release, Fly Fishing Only
  Over 34 years of fly fishing experience

  Call or write for details:

  Bob Triggs
  Little Stone Flyfisher
  P.O. Box 261
  Port Townsend, Wa
  98368
  360-385-9618
  littlestoneflyfisher@mail.com
  www.washingtonflyfishing.com/guides/littlestone
  http://olympicpeninsulaflyfishing.blogspot.com
  www.facebook.com/LittleStoneFlyfisher

Wednesday, April 2, 2014

Rites Of Spring





Rites Of Spring


"Hope"
   I took a row in the dory along the beaches on Monday afternoon. I was scouting for feeding Cutthroat. It was a sunny afternoon, but cool and breezy at about 10 to 15 knots. And as luck sometimes works out, the wind was against me most of the way out, for about two miles. There was a soft one foot chop to the water. Many days these winds blow out by sundown. And for a short trip along the shore I wasn't too worried about it anyway. Most of the time I could walk and wade in the same places that I am rowing. There was enough of a wind riffle on the water to  make it difficult to see any surface action from the small fry schools. I did however see plenty of juveniles making their way down the sheltered, tea colored creek, most at under two inches, in densely grouped "schools." Of course the Kingfishers and Herons are already getting in on this annual bonanza of food. These Summer Chum will come back in a few years, many of them well over ten pounds by then. The habitat restoration work of the North Olympic Salmon Coalition has been steadily improving this watershed for over 20 years. For many years this salmon run was extirpated. For the first time in over 15,000 years of human interactions there were no salmon in some of these places. Now they are coming home to spawn every fall. And any time that you improve salmon habitat, the Cutthroat trout will be close by. The next time you are sea run fishing on the north Olympic Peninsula, anywhere from the Hood Canal Bridge to the Sooes River in Neah Bay, remember that many dedicated volunteers and professionals have been working very hard for decades to improve these coastal watersheds. Maybe you'll support them too.

It's all about the habitat!

    It is generally not too soon for sea run Coastal Cutthroat trout fly fishing on Puget Sound regional waters right now. And I know plenty of people who fish for them all winter long. But we do know that many of these fish are spawning during the spring, and March seems to be the big month for this. So by the end of March these post spawn fish might be underweight, and lacking the kind of power and zeal that make them such a good game fish for fly fishermen. It can not be good for these fish to be hooked and played and handled in this condition. It won't hurt to give them a few weeks to recover, bulk up feeding on the fry, and regain their former status as scrappy, hard hitting, Welterweight trout. This March has been unusually wet, and the extra rainfall has given most of our streams and rivers a big boost in flows. And there has also been lower temperatures earlier in the month. So the streams have run cold and high for weeks. And it is believed that this can slow down spawning in the Cutthroat, and perhaps also briefly delay the Chum fry in their emergence from their gravel redds in the rivers.

Yearling sea run Cutthroat take the Chum Baby fly!
 
    Mid to late April is the beginning of the better spring fishing for sea runs around here on the north Olympic Peninsula. And down in the South Sound area it seems to get going a few weeks earlier. We are at the cusp of some of the best fishing of the year. Right now I am tying my spring flies, chiefly my Little Stone's Chum Baby and Little Stone's Beach Baby, and since it is a Pink Salmon fry year here again, I am tying my Little Stone's Pinkie Baby fly too. These patterns will work throughout the spring. I tie them small and sparse in the early weeks. But by mid to later May they are well over two inches long. It is not that this is the only fly that will work right now. But imitating the available forage is going to be the best strategy. And right now there a a gazillion Pink salmon and Chum salmon fry out there, all making their way into the salt waters and migrating north with the spring. There are many other marine and terrestrial forage species of significance to our sea run Coastal Cutthroat trout fishing here. And I will be detailing some of those in future blogs this spring and early summer.


Fly Fishing Author and Guide Richard Stoll met up with this hefty sea run Cutthroat,
using my Chum Baby fly on an early season scouting trip.
www.westsoundangler.com )

Fly Casting Tune-Up!
    Spring is a good time for a tune-up of your fly casting skills. Fly casting is the very heart and soul of this game. If you can't cast well enough, your fishing is not going to go all that well either. This is one sport that you can improve at throughout your lifetime. By the time that you get back into fishing this season you won't have much time for practice. I teach all levels of fly casting, from beginner to expert. So if you want to learn from the basics on up, or you just need a little help with getting that extra bit of distance or accuracy, let me help you. I have many years of teaching experience and I hold several Casting Instructor Certifications.

Fly Fishing Instruction and Guided Trips
   By the end of April I will be back on the Olympic Peninsula waters, teaching the arts of fly fishing and fly casting, and guiding fly fishers for catch & release only, freshwater and saltwater. Trout, Sea Run Coastal Cutthroat Trout & Summer Steelhead. Please write or call for details.

Bob Triggs
Little Stone Flyfisher
P.O. Box 261
Port Townsend, Wa
98368

360-385-9618

email: littlestoneflyfisher@mail.com
blog:  http://olympicpeninsulaflyfishing.blogspot.com
web:  www.facebook.com/LittleStoneFlyfisher




   

 


Friday, March 7, 2014

It's Chum Baby Time! . . . Again.





   It's Chum Baby Time!


The whole point! 
Photo credit U.S.F.W.S.
   March on the north Olympic Peninsula rivers is peak spawning time for most of our sea-run Coastal Cutthroat trout. So it's no surprise that we don't see very many of them on the beaches right now. With the milder winter we have had this year it is likely that most of them have already spawned and some are well on their way to the salt. But by April they will be showing up in greater numbers up here, chasing the juvenile Chum and Pink salmon all over the place, and fattening up. And it doesn't hurt a bit that last year we had some very strong runs of these salmon returning to our watersheds to spawn. For the last month or more the regional biologists and technicians, using smolt traps, have been counting the out migrating fry as they move out of the gravel redds and down to the estuaries. This will continue for many weeks to come here. And just about the time that the post spawning Cutthroat, and some of their younger brethren, have dropped out of the rivers and streams, down to the estuaries and shorelines, the Chum and Pink salmon juveniles will be well distributed in the same places. The Cutthroat will be feeding with reckless zeal. These fish, both predator and prey alike, have evolved through this dance over many tens of thousands of years here. As fly fishers it behooves us to learn about these things. Now is the time! This fly is also doing well up in Alaska, on the early season Lake Iliamna tributaries and Katmai National Park region Rainbows and Char, Grayling etc., that are feeding on fry and smolt in the rivers. And now some of my whacko smallmouth bass fishing buddies are cleaning up with the Chum Baby fly on the rivers and lakes too. So we are discovering that this fly has some application beyond the shores of Puget Sound country. You should be using this fly anywhere that the big fish eat the little fish!
   
Invasion!
    Dozens of Chum Baby flies have once migrated across Puget Sound, across the I-405 Bridge, and all of the way upstream to the Orvis Bellevue Fly Shop!

If you are in the Seattle area, drop in to the Belevue Orvis Shop!

   Tie your own Chum Baby flies!

   If you would like to tie your own Chum Baby flies, from my original pattern and written instructions, I will be happy to provide two sample tying model flies, tied by myself, and the written instructions. 

   Just send $5.00 and a self addressed legal sized return envelope to:

   Bob Triggs
   P.O. Box 261
   Port Townsend, WA
   98368

   Your Fly Is Open! 
   


   




Many thanks to The Open Fly Podcast team for our recent interview about my decision to stop guiding for our Olympic Peninsula wild winter steelhead. And thank you to the fine people who have contacted me in support. This was one of the hardest choices I have had to make as a guide here. You can listen to our recent interview, which is in the second half of episode # 7, at: The Open Fly Podcast  
   

   Sea Run Coastal Cutthroat trout fly fishing trips-
  Catch and Release, fly fishing only.
Bob Triggs releasing a bright wild sea run Coastal Cutthroat trout. April 2013
Photo Credit Richard Stoll
   We will be back on the water by mid to late April this spring, just in time for the beginning of another beautiful season of wild sea run Coastal Cutthroat trout fly fishing on the saltwaters of the Olympic Peninsula, Hood Canal and Puget Sound. Drop me a note or give me a call for details.

   Bob Triggs
   Little Stone Flyfisher
   littlestoneflyfisher@mail.com
   360-385-9618
   www.facebook.com/LittleStoneFlyfisher







Monday, February 17, 2014

Olympic Peninsula Wild Steelhead- Why aren't they listed too?





  Olympic Peninsula Wild Steelhead- Why aren't they listed too?

   By current conventional wisdom February through April is considered "prime time" for winter run wild steelhead fishing out here on the Olympic Peninsula. And if you were to rely upon all of the advertising- for guides, shops, tackle, boats, rods, reels, flies, jigs, lures, waders, boats, etc., you would believe that the fish are fairly teeming up the rivers out here by now. And even though the hatchery origin winter steelhead ordinarily outnumber the wild fish here, even on some rivers that do not have a hatchery, the wild fish runs draw the crowds. And it is all the more crowded out here, with many more anglers, boats and guides, now that the Puget Sound rivers are closed to protect those rivers late winter run wild steelhead under the Endangered Species Act. Apparently no one at Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife felt that it would be necessary to afford these last remaining runs of wild winter steelhead any further protections out here. And so the harvest continues here, on severely depressed runs of fish. And almost no one is left alive today who remembers the fact that there were many big runs of huge wild steelhead, as early as October and November on these rivers. Now they are gone, replaced with hatchery fish. Meh . . . Tell me how good it all is.

   The Hoh River wild winter steelhead run failed to achieve the "Spawner Escapement Goal" numbers last winter. And this has happened frequently, over the last 13 years that I have been out here, and for nearly half of the previous twenty years before that as well. In my opinion those "goal" numbers are way too low to begin with. The Hoh River could host many tens of thousands of spawning wild steelhead every year. And yet the state is hoping for just a little over 2000 fish to spawn. Perhaps the concern is that if too many fish were to get into the river all at once, all of them rubbing side-by-side, as they get packed in so tightly, that the resulting friction might generate enough heat to actually boil off all of the water! Your guess is as good as mine. But it is a fact that we are now at something like 4% or less of historic known 1900's abundance. And that was well less than what was here before the settlers came west. But let's blame it all on the tribes anyway. And that way we won't have to change.

   And the Hoh River wild salmon are not faring any better. Last year the Olympic National Park fisheries managers closed the Hoh River within park boundaries to ALL fishing from spring through fall, to protect the remnant runs of wild Chinook salmon, which now number but a few hundred. And true to form, in their inscrutable wisdom W.D.F&W. managers kept the state owned portion of the river open for fishing anyway. And so the new cadre of guides, and anglers, and the old timers too, came out here to swing spey flies, nymphs, beads, jigs, floats and lures, over those last few wild fish, just as they have every year. And most of them claim to be summer steelhead fishing. There was some outrage expressed over the NPS closure of the season, as so many anglers now feel that they are providing a necessary public service in fishing for the upriver stray hatchery origin steelhead. Even if they are hooking, over playing, landing and GoPro-gloating over the last handful of wild salmon along the way. 

   It's not just the Hoh River wild steelhead- all of these rivers wild runs are in trouble! "Why aren't they listed?" They waited too long to list the Puget Sound rivers runs under the Endangered Species Act, and they are waiting too long to list the Olympic Peninsula wild steelhead as well. It's not about science or reality, it's about politics!

   We have some of the most beautiful wild rivers in the lower 48 states. Much of the upper watersheds and wild fish spawning and rearing habitats are intact because of the protections afforded by the Olympic National Park boundaries, and the Park regulations specific protections on Olympic Peninsula wild steelhead. Yet the numbers of wild spawning anadromous fish remaining here are truly, embarrassingly tragic in their diminished status. It only took a few human generations to crush the fish here. There is plenty of blame to go around, as the sports fishermen argue over who has done the most harm, blaming each other, blaming "the state" and the tribes. And the science, and various scientists and biostitutes alike, seem to point in so many directions all at once, to explain the loss of the fish, that they always provide an abundance of distractions from any serious discussion of how we all must change our ways. Someday they will be standing at the riverside with armloads of data, and no fish.

    But for now- I won't be guiding anyone for winter run wild Olympic Peninsula Steelhead any more. Personally I feel that it has gone too far out here. The numbers of wild fish do not support sports fishing, not even a catch and release fishery. Not when we are talking about a "handful" of fish returning, and only a few thousand escaping the gauntlet of nets, boats and hooks to spawn. And according to the state's own observations, most of the escaped fish were caught and released by anglers too. How many times? So many anglers and guides will cite research that supports their claim that "Catch and release does no harm." I'm sorry- That is Bullshit. Not with the numbers like what we have here now. 

   And we know that hatcheries are very limited in their utility as anything but a stop-gap measure to extend fishing opportunity for those who would suckle the State Hatchery Tit. And yet there is a small gang of guides here now who are seriously promoting the notion that we can have a "balance" of wild and hatchery fish here, and that we should have even more hatchery production. Even though there is ample peer reviewed, published scientific research to show that hatchery fish are detrimental to wild fish in a number of demonstrable ways. They even produced their own industry sponsored movie to sell this idea. Please. Shame on you!  Look at what happened throughout the Pacific Northwest this winter, as  the winter hatchery runs never really showed up. And they don't yet know exactly why. Does anyone have a concern that something similar may have befallen the wild winter steelhead this year as well?  No? Let's wait until spring, after the spawner survey counts are concluded, to address that. No sense in changing our ways at this late date.

   How much do we have to lose, before we can't get them back? No one really knows. But I do know that when they finally have closed down fishing, it is very slow to ever look anything like a seriously valid recovery. And as soon as they get a few fish back, they go harvest them again. A well managed catch and release season, on healthy self sustaining populations of wild fish, has proven to be a valid management tool. But it is not a valid recovery tool on rapidly diminishing runs! Washington maintains this fishing as an "all or nothing game." We are almost down to nothing here now. Aside from my own contempt for the way that the managers, the angling community and "the industry" have conducted themselves out here, as far as any kind of responsible stewardship or advocacy, and due to the ever growing frequency of encounters with asinine, rude and stupid behavior while on the water, I can not in good conscience promote trips for the last wild steelhead.

   I have been screaming about this ever since I came here almost 14 years ago. Washington has  serious a credibility problem with it's fisheries management system. We need to take this issue to the Legislature, to our elected Representatives and our Governor, and to the Press, and to the streets. We should be boycotting WDF&W and their Steelhead Seasons! 

   3/8/14 Note:

  








   My many thanks to The Open Fly Podcast team for our recent  interview. To listen to the recorded podcast go to The Open Fly  Podcast Episode #7 (My segment is in the second half of the  episode.)  This has been the hardest decision of all in my time      guiding out here on the Olympic Peninsula.   
 

  


I'm really looking forward to sea-run Coastal Cutthroat fishing on the saltchuck this spring.      
  See you then!

  Bob Triggs
  Little Stone Flyfisher
  littlestoneflyfisher@mail.com


    

Monday, December 23, 2013

"A Chance Of Rain"


Your Olympic Peninsula Fly Fishing Guide.
Catch and Release, Fly Fishing Only!

"A Chance Of Rain"


"Winter's Hope" 
(Courtesy of  Marty Howard)
   
   We have had an uncommonly mild and dry autumn this year. The winter solstice week has brought us a little much needed rain, and the Olympic Peninsula coastal rivers are rising in flows today. The winter (hatchery run) steelhead season has been pretty slow out here so far, with only  a few fish caught off and on since Thanksgiving. Most attribute this to the low water we have had all of this past autumn. The winter solstice has brought back some moisture, and we have gotten some brief warm up periods, and a little rain, enough to stir things back to life. The weather pattern we are in right now may set us up for some good fishing conditions during the rest of the week, and possibly into the New Year.

"A chance of rain"

      It is a honking, blustery cold and windy winter day on the peninsula today. We expect it to be milder ahead, briefly anyway. Normally, November is the wettest month of the year here. This fall it just didn't go that way. Though this first week of winter feels pretty normal to me- a little wind and rain, some fresh water in the rivers, snow in the mountains, and an encouraging spell of weather to follow, and "a chance of rain", at least in the forecast. We hope the fish will follow suit. Sometimes when it's been a protracted period of low water, and once we do get some rain and stronger flows, the fish come upriver pretty quickly, perhaps quite a few. And these fish can be fun to catch. So maybe this will be just what was needed to get the fish moving, to shake out the cobwebs, and get us back on the rivers. Winter is the prettiest time of year here, the rain forest is so lush, green and vibrant. The jade colored waters entice.

"An endless series of occasions for hope"

     Good local bets for targeting the hatchery steelhead are going to be on the Sol Duc, Bogachiele, Calawah, Quillayute-  usually downriver of the hatcheries. And that is where you will run into all of the other people who are fishing for them too, on foot and in boats. Thick as thieves, thick as flies . . . And some of them will be just plain thick. I like to get away from all of that, and get upriver a little. Sometimes there are plenty of hatchery strain steelhead well upriver, especially early in the season, even in the rivers that do not have hatchery runs formally established on them.

   And you will encounter far fewer people.

   Remember that the Sol Duc river has been set aside for natural reproduction of wild steelhead now. And so hatchery strain steelhead smolt planting has ceased, as has the Snyder Creek Hatchery program. But on the Sol Duc River, being integral to the Quillayute River System, it is not at all surprising that we can still catch hatchery steelhead there.

Winter run.

   This is why I prefer walk and wade fly fishing here. It is not that I don't like rowing, I certainly do, and I have thousands of river miles behind me on many lower 48 rivers, here, in New England, in Alaska, and Kamchatka Russia too. But I feel that the boats are too many and the manners too few here. And that's not what I got into this game for. This is one of those unintended consequences of hatchery fish production- there is a tendency for people to take the fish, the rivers, and their fellow fishermen for granted. I try to see each one as a gift. And I hope that you will too. And please remember that when you are fishing with me- all wild fish are to be released without avoidable injury. So now, let's dust off our spey and Skagit rods, clean and lube our reels, sort out our sink tips and shooting heads, check all of our rigging knots and connections, make sure to have fresh new tippet and leader materials, then go spin up some really pretty and bright flies, and let's go fishing!

 Happy Holidays to you! 
Gift Certificate Trips available year-round!


 
"Last cast"

    We'll be walk and wade fishing these beautiful Olympic Peninsula rivers all winter.  Our early winter-run Steelhead are coming into the Olympic Peninsula coastal rivers with each spate that we are having, all through early winter so far. If you would like to plan a fishing date with me- do it well ahead of time. Winter sea-run Cutthroat beach trips as well.

Remember: Catch & Release, Traditional Fly fishing Only! 
    Beginners welcome. Full instruction available. Complete support assured. Use of equipment available. Picnic lunch and soft beverages provided. Celebrating over 33 years of international fly fishing adventures!

    Please call or write for booking details:

Bob Triggs
Little Stone Flyfisher
P.O. Box 261
Port Townsend, WA
98368

Licensed Washington State Guide.
Certified Fly Casting Instructor.
Trout Unlimited Aquatic Educator Award.
U.S.C.G. Cert?BLS/BBP/HIV/CPR/First Aid.
Private and public presentations.
Row Boat Picnics on a local salmon estuary.

Telephone: 360-385-9618

Email: littlestoneflyfisher@mail.com

Web: Little Stone Flyfisher

Like us On Facebook! www.facebook.com/LittleStoneFlyfisher


 

   


  

Monday, December 9, 2013

Arctic December Surprise



Your Olympic Peninsula Fly Fishing Guide
Catch & Release, Fly Fishing Only!

   Arctic December Surprise

Counting spawning Coho.
   
    December 9th update. 

    Ever since Thanksgiving weekend the Olympic Peninsula coastal steelhead rivers have been drawing down in flows, beneath a deep freeze that has lasted most of the last two weeks. It has been very cold and dry. And This does slow down the fishing. But despite these low and clear, cold conditions, the winter run hatchery steelhead are showing up on time, and the fishermen are catching them. And we do expect that the fish will follow their usual schedule, and continue to be showing up in their greatest numbers through Christmas and New Years day. 


Working a winter run.

   Just in time- RAIN! The arctic weather is going to be progressively moderating all week ahead here, as warmer air moves in, and we do see some blessed rain on the horizon. It looks to be coming in slowly, with Thursday and Friday likely seeing some more significant rainfall and a warming trend. No doubt the rivers will come up to some degree. The rivers and the fish need this rain. And we fishermen will appreciate the warmer temperatures too. This week should be good, and getting better, if we get the minor rainfall each day or night or so, along the way. I don't think anyone can yet say how next weekend will be. It could go either way by then. Even if the bigger water does come up to become an issue, there are often many upriver spots, and smaller waters, that are open and approachable for this fishing. I am looking forward to some cloudy, dripping wet weather myself. And these fish will become more reactive to a fly with a warming trend too. Just be sure to get it in front of them, deep and slow.

   We'll be walk and wade fishing these beautiful Olympic Peninsula rivers all winter.  Our early winter-run Steelhead are coming into the Olympic Peninsula coastal rivers with each spate that we have been having, all through autumn and early winter so far. If you would like to plan a fishing date with me- do it well ahead of time. Winter sea-run Cutthroat beach trips as well.
Remember: Catch & Release, Traditional Fly fishing Only! 
    Beginners welcome. Full instruction available. Complete support assured. Use of equipment available. Picnic lunch and soft beverages provided. Celebrating over 33 years of international fly fishing adventures!

    Please call or write for booking details:

Bob Triggs
Little Stone Flyfisher
P.O. Box 261
Port Townsend, WA
98368

Licensed Washington State Guide.
Certified Fly Casting Instructor.
Trout Unlimited Aquatic Educator Award.
U.S.C.G. Cert?BLS/BBP/HIV/CPR/First Aid.
Private and public presentations.
Row Boat Picnics on a local salmon estuary.

Telephone: 360-385-9618 / International Toll Free: 866-793-3595

Email: littlestoneflyfisher@mail.com

Web: Little Stone Flyfisher

Like us On Facebook! www.facebook.com/LittleStoneFlyfisher


    

Monday, December 2, 2013

December, and Murphy's Law on the Olympic Peninsula


Your Olympic Peninsula Fly Fishing Guide.
Catch & Release Fly Fishing Only!



December
  Our winter steelhead season is beginning with a blast of cold arctic air today, directly on the heels of a brief end of Thanksgiving weekend storm that dropped a lot of wind, snow and rain in the Olympic Mountains on Sunday, and drove the river flow gauges straight upwards in the span of one day. Right now- now that it is Monday and you are back at work- all of those river gauges are on the drop, and our waters are approaching a steep return to normal seasonal flows. You will want to be here to greet the next push of winter run steelhead that will be riding this most recent spate in these rivers. There are already winter fish upriver. Freezing temperatures will likely hold at very low elevations for some days and nights ahead, so the conditions will only improve as these rivers calm down. It will be cold enough to improve water clarity quickly as well. The smaller waters, and some upriver reaches of the coastal rivers and streams are already in good shape for fishing today. Most of these December winter run steelhead are hatchery origin fish, and there are plenty of them.


What a difference a day makes . . .
Or, "Murphy's Law of Winter Steelhead Fishing."

  So if you were able to fish here this weekend- you encountered some very low flows, gin clear water in many places, and some hard to catch fish. And you would have had plenty of company on the water as well. Surely the Fish Gods are laughing at all of us now, as today's turn of events sets the stage for a week of nearly perfect conditions for anyone who wants to swing a steelhead fly out here this coming week.

  If I were you . . . I would be calling the boss and letting him know that I was too well to be working this week. But then, that's just me. And I don't mind sleeping in my truck in the rainforest and living on peanut butter and coffee. And swinging flies on the bright waters of winter here, catching chrome bright winter run steelhead, while everyone else is at work. Your mileage may vary.

  Just Saying.


We'll be walk and wade fishing these beautiful Olympic Peninsula rivers all winter.  Our early winter-run Steelhead are coming into the Olympic Peninsula coastal rivers with each spate that we have been having, all through autumn and early winter so far. If you would like to plan a fishing date with me- do it well ahead of time. Winter sea-run Cutthroat beach trips as well.

  Remember: Catch & Release, Traditional Fly fishing Only! 

 Beginners welcome. Full instruction available. Complete support assured. Use of equipment available. Picnic lunch and soft beverages provided. Celebrating over 33 years of international fly fishing adventures!

Please call or write for booking details:

Bob Triggs
Little Stone Flyfisher
P.O. Box 261
Port Townsend, WA
98368

Licensed Washington State Guide.
Certified Fly Casting Instructor.
Trout Unlimited Aquatic Educator Award.
U.S.C.G. Cert?BLS/BBP/HIV/CPR/First Aid.
Private and public presentations.
Row Boat Picnics on a local salmon estuary.

Telephone: 360-385-9618 / International Toll Free: 866-793-3595

Email: littlestoneflyfisher@mail.com

Web: Little Stone Flyfisher

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