Monday, December 15, 2014

The Gift of Fly Fishing



Your Olympic Peninsula fly fishing guide,
catch & release, fly fishing only!


Winter. 



   The gift of fly fishing


    It is only the second week of December and yet we have had winter and autumn weather on and off since late October. November saw some truly arctic cold days, and we got some good early snow pack at higher altitudes in the mountains. December rolled in with a warm blast that sent the rivers skyrocketing. We just got through some of the wildest days I have ever seen here, as far as wind and rain goes, and there have been several records broken for Autumn and December temperatures. And it's not even winter solstice yet. The rivers are on the drop now, the mountains are getting colder again, we're seeing much better flows than we have seen here in weeks, and those early winter, hatchery run steelhead are still rolling in. I will be guiding for the hatchery runs through December. I will not be guiding for wild winter run steelhead on the Olympic Peninsula rivers. The runs are too severely diminished now, and I don't think that we should be fishing for them at all.

Early winter sea-run Cutthroat fishing.

    On the beaches

   On the beaches here we have seen some beautiful days between the storms and freezes. I think that some of the sea-run Cutthroat do get back out into the saltwater to feed, when the smaller rivers get too dirty and flooded in the winter. And the saltwater clears up quickly after the storms. When we do catch Cutthroat here in the winter they tend to be larger fish, Well worth the effort. And thankfully we are in the Olympic Mountain Rainshadow, so we do enjoy much fairer  weather than the areas to the north, south east and west of us. The mountains protect us. Seattle gets about twice to three times the amount of the rain that we get here near Port Townsend in the winter. If we get a few sunny, mild days in a  row here, the trout will come back up to the surface to feed along the beaches. For my guests who come in the winter months, I keep an eye on conditions and forecasts here, and I let them know when things are looking right for a day of beach fishing. And we do catch a few nice wild fish around here. Yes, even in the winter.


 "All that is not given is lost." 
Mahatma Gandhi

   One thing that I try to hang onto is the notion that our fishing lives are a kind of gift. It is inscrutable to me that there are people who have no interest in the outdoors life. They have no sense of wonder at the sight of the first flock of migrating geese, nor for the sound of the first loon of the year coming back from the arctic, they get no anticipation of  a wild fish on the other end of their line. I have met some of these people, and I have guided a few. Once afield, they are strangers in a strange land. I have no idea how this works, but there are some people who are never going to be outdoors people, they won't go hiking or camping, nor will they ever be true fishers or hunters. It is just true. I have spent my whole life in outdoors adventures. When I am away from the trails and the waters for too long, life becomes a place where I am merely waiting to live, until the next outing, and the next raindrop on my face and the wind at my back. I have always been this way. The modern world offers me very little solace. But taking a brief walk beneath the tall firs, or a hike along a river trail, a few hours of wading and casting, some light on the water and a row along the bay, and I am healed. Sometimes all that it takes is a glimpse of a hawk or eagle, briefly sweeping across the sky, an owls distant hooting in the night, to remind me that I am a part of something greater, and that we all share this life with every living thing. It is a blessing to experience life in this sometimes primal way. You might know what I mean- A sense of Unity.

Happy Holidays!!!



Fly Fishing Gift Trips

   As a reminder to you, and for the holidays- I offer fly fishing gift trips to anglers year round. These are a guided day of fly fishing, for one or two anglers, including lunch, snacks and soft beverages. I share my own custom tied flies for the day as we fish these beautiful waters. Once you contact me to arrange this gift for your friend or loved one, I will provide you with a gift card for you to give to the recipient. And they can then get in touch with me in advance to work out the details of their Olympic Peninsula fly fishing adventure. This gift trip is valid for beach or river fishing, catch & release fly fishing only. I also offer rowboat picnics on a quiet estuary here, or private fly casting instruction sessions. Contact me for the details.


Olympic Peninsula Fly Fishing Guide and Instructor

  I am guiding fly fishers on the Olympic Peninsula beaches, rivers and streams. We walk and wade, fly fishing for sea-run Coastal Cutthroat trout in freshwater and saltwater, and in the rivers for trout and summer steelhead. This is strictly catch and release, traditional fly fishing only. Lunch, snacks, soft beverages, and use of some equipment is included. I also offer personalized and private fly fishing and fly  casting instruction for beginners.  I would be happy to help you plan your Olympic Peninsula fly fishing adventure, for beginners through expert anglers. Public presentations, Naturalist guide for rowboat picnics, Tide Pool and  river trail day trips. Please call, write or email for booking details.  

Bob Triggs
Little Stone Flyfisher
P.O. Box 261
Port Townsend, WA
98368

Licensed Washington State Guide 
Certified Fly Casting Instructor
Trout Unlimited Aquatic Educator Award
U.S.C.G First Aid/CPR/BLS/AED/BBP/HIV Certified

Phone: 360-385-9618



Monday, October 20, 2014

October, Wet & Wild!


Your Olympic Peninsula fly fishing guide,
Catch & Release, Fly Fishing only!


   October, Wet & Wild!


The Hoh River gauge doesn't lie.

   Let's just say that we have finally gotten that rain that we have needed. Over the last few weeks we have seen a building pattern of warmer air and intermittent rain, that has really recharged our summer-drought-dry region and renewed the flows in the Olympic Peninsula rivers. The rain forest has lost the dusty grey mantel of summer, and regained the dripping wet beauty that signals the real change of seasons here. Suddenly everything is a deep, vibrant shade of green. The rivers have been bouncing up and down in flows, with each front that has swept across the Olympic mountains creating a surge in the renewal of life and energy. And you can bet that the autumn fish are appreciating this opportunity to get moving too. Summer steelhead and cutthroat trout will be attuned to these changes in flows, temperatures etc., and they will be feeding on the abundance of big meaty October Caddis flies that are hatching now. With this unusually warm weather, and no hard freeze in sight yet, we may expect that the hatches will persist well into November. It has happened before. 

   On the salt- The wind has really been piping in on most days here lately. We have had gales and small craft warnings on several occasions over the last weeks. Yet most mornings here have been calm, and often the evening hours near sunset can be calm as well. Just something to remember- when you are looking at the marine weather forecasts, and it all looks bad. Sometimes you can get a few hours of fishing in the early morning, and again at the end of the day. That way you still have time to clean the gutters and rake the yard. The sea run Cutthroat and coho have been cooperative, and we do expect to continue the beach fishing too through this mild autumn. Beach fishing is a wonderful alternative to the rivers, when most of them get too high after the rains. And even if your favorite beach is exposed to the wind and waves, you can usually find another beach that does not have the same exposure, and get some good fishing in anyway. It pays to have a map of the region and be willing to do some exploring. 

10/22/14  Update

   Check out Dr Cliff Mass weather blog for an update on the big wind and rain storm we are in right now. The west-end Olympic Peninsula rivers, as well as most of western Washington's other rivers, are bank full and running hard and dirty now, with more rain on the way. Looks like the saltwater may be one of the better options, if you can get out of the wind. I can't wait for these rivers to drop back into shape.   



Autumn steelhead and trout fishing,
 on the jade green waters of the Olympic Peninsula rain forest.

    Right now I am tying some more summer steelhead and cutthroat flies for this late autumn fishing. And by the way that this fall weather has been shaping up the rivers so far, I am going to be sure to tie some "winter" patterns on heavier hooks too. And though I prefer dry line and surface fly fishing to just about any other way of presenting a fly to summer steelhead and trout here, I will be bringing along my sink tips and heavy sink or "Poly" leaders too. Once these rivers get deeper, colder, and flowing stronger, we sometimes have to use winter skills to get the fly to slow down and hunt in front of the fish. Temperature and flow are important considerations no matter what season you are fishing. We can usually find some good dry line water here anyway, but this is about increasing your options for presenting the fly On the swing. (No "bobbers" required!


"A man's reach should exceed his grasp, or what's a heaven for?"

   Speaking of steelhead flies. I don't think that you can find a better example of traditional Olympic Peninsula steelhead flies than the flies tied by the legendary Syd Glasso of Forks, Wa. I have friends here who had Mr Glasso for their elementary school teacher. And when they were doing well in class he would reward the students with one of his own hand tied flies.These flies are priceless today. I have had the good fortune to see quite a few of these classic flies, they are elegant in their symmetry, simplicity and colors. In use they come to life, glowing in the emerald waters with each swing. British Columbia author, artisan fly tier and angler Art Lingren recently shared some pictures of some of these classic steelhead flies, tied by Mr Glasso in the 1980's. Posted here with permission. These are the flies I want to learn how to tie. I guess I have my work cut out for me.



The Courtesan Spey
by Syd Glasso
Art Lingren photo

The Quillayute Spey
by Syd Glasso
Art Lingren photo


The Orange Heron
by Syd Glasso
Art Lingren photo


The Sol Duc Spey
by Syd Glasso
Art Lingren photo


The Thunder & Lightning
by Syd Glasso
Art Lingren photo


Unnamed Spey, White Heron
by Syd Glasso
Art Lingren photo


Brown Heron
by Syd Glasso
Art Lingren photo


The Spirit Fly
by Syd Glasso
Art Lingren photo



Olympic Peninsula Fly Fishing Guide and Instructor

  I am guiding fly fishers on the Olympic Peninsula beaches, rivers and streams. We walk and wade, fly fishing for sea-run Coastal Cutthroat trout in freshwater and saltwater, and in the rivers for trout and summer steelhead. This is strictly catch and release, traditional fly fishing only. Lunch, snacks, soft beverages, and use of some equipment is included. Personalized and private fly fishing and fly  casting instruction.  I would be happy to help you plan your Olympic Peninsula adventure. casting instruction, and guided trips are available, for beginners through expert anglers. Public presentations, Naturalist guide for rowboat picnics, Tide Pool and river trail day trips. Please call, write or email for booking details.  

Bob Triggs
Little Stone Flyfisher
P.O. Box 261
Port Townsend, WA
98368

Licensed Washington State Guide 
Certified Fly Casting Instructor
Trout Unlimited Aquatic Educator Award
U.S.C.G First Aid/CPR/BLS/AED/BBP/HIV Certified

Phone: 360-385-9618



  



Tuesday, October 7, 2014

October Expectations



Your Olympic Peninsula fly fishing guide.
Catch & release, fly fishing only.

October expectations


Harbinger of fall.

 This autumn has to be one of the nicest I have ever endured here on the Olympic Peninsula. Our dry season has extended well through the first week of October, and we have had summer weather all along. Of course this means that the rivers are very low right now. But we have been having some really good beach fishing for the last month here. The sea run Coastal Cutthroat trout have been available, entertaining and willing to take our flies. And some of the nicest fish of the year are haunting our beaches in September and October. Just about everywhere north of the Columbia River system the coho have been slow to show. We have seen them caught here on our beaches with some consistency, tide to tide, over the last three weeks. And with plenty of good reports from the fishing west of here, in Sekiu etc., we expect to see coho on our beaches through October.


My friend Andy caught  a nice little coho on the beach.



The sea-run Cutthroat are a little bigger this time of year. 

It wouldn't be autumn without the rain. So don't be fooled by these temporary arid conditions. One resource for reliable forecasting is the great Professor Cliff Mass at the University of Washington. Check out his Monday October 6th posting for the scoop on the incoming moisture cycle next week. By the weekend we should be seeing some rain in the Olympic Mountains, and some new life on our streams. It looks like autumn is moving in for real now. With the full moon tides this week we can expect that the fish will keep moving, on the beaches and in the rivers. There is no serious weather on the screen this week ahead, so we should have some good fishing into the weekend and maybe longer. In my perfect world the fall rains would slowly seep in. We could fish dry flies all of the way through the fall hatch. It just might happen that way this time. But for now, you could skate a big fluffy muddler fly across the tides and see what happens. I am so ready for the refreshing autumn season, the dripping wet cedar trees, their tops bowing with the weight of mist and rain, the hot cider and apples, and wood smoke in the air. 

Autumn fishing means afternoon coffee breaks.
We are loving the Boiler Room Espresso blend from Sunrise Coffee Company
!
www.sunrisecoffee.net



Olympic Peninsula Fly Fishing Guide and Instructor

  I am guiding fly fishers on the Olympic Peninsula beaches, rivers and streams. We walk and wade, fly fishing for sea-run Coastal Cutthroat trout in freshwater and saltwater, and in the rivers for trout and summer steelhead. This is strictly catch and release, traditional fly fishing only. Lunch, snacks, soft beverages, and use of some equipment is included. Personalized and private fly fishing and fly  casting instruction.  I would be happy to help you plan your Olympic Peninsula adventure. casting instruction, and guided trips are available, for beginners through expert anglers. Public presentations, Naturalist guide for rowboat picnics, Tide Pool and river trail day trips. Please call, write or email for booking details.  

Bob Triggs
Little Stone Flyfisher
P.O. Box 261
Port Townsend, WA
98368

Licensed Washington State Guide 
Certified Fly Casting Instructor
Trout Unlimited Aquatic Educator Award
U.S.C.G First Aid/CPR/BLS/AED/BBP/HIV Certified

Phone: 360-385-9618










Thursday, September 25, 2014

Autumn Equinox Rain, and a New Moon







Your Olympic Peninsula fly fishing guide,
Catch & Release, Fly fishing only!

Autumn Equinox Rain

  This autumn equinox came on with a splash! We are definitely in the big change to cooler and wetter weather here now. And I am not complaining. The weather moved in fast here, with a big low front on the Pacific coast that has driven some much needed rain across the parched Olympic Mountains. The rivers jumped up pretty quickly here today too.


Graph of  Discharge, cubic feet per second


   
    The barometer came up to nearly 30 mm on Thursday so this storm has been moderating, with light to brief, heavy rainfall, mixed sun and clouds and WIND. I hear that the coast had 50 knot winds and waves over 30 feet high! And the rivers also calmed down. We have more rain coming tonight and into Friday. I was driving home across the Hood Canal Bridge tonight and I could see curtains of rain enclosing the Olympics in a misty shroud. The mood is definitely changing. By the weekend they predict that we will have gotten some 2 to 5 inches of rain. But mostly it is a soaker. This is the beginning of autumn in earnest. And the rivers will rise some more too. This is going to get some fish moving now, in the saltwater and in the rivers. A perfect launch to our autumn fishing. And the coming weekend is supposed to be very nice. 

   Speaking of the Hoh River, last week I mentioned that the National Park Service had temporarily closed all fishing on the Hoh River, within the upper river reaches inside of the Olympic National Park boundaries, including the South Fork Hoh River, to protect the spawning Chinook salmon there. Check the dates and boundaries in each of these following links carefully.

http://www.nps.gov/olym/parknews/emergency-closure-of-all-fishing-in-the-upper-hoh-and-south-fork-hoh-rivers.htm

 Today the Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife closed all fishing on the state waters of the Hoh River, from Morgan's Crossing upstream to the Park boundaries. 

 https://fortress.wa.gov/dfw/erules/efishrules/erule.jsp?id=1496

 Once those Hoh River chinook salmon are done spawning in a few weeks, you can get up there and cast a fly to the summer steelhead and cutthroat. 

    Meanwhile, we will be getting some serious October Caddis action out here for the next month or more on our rivers. And those cutthroat and steelhead will be willing. Many of our west-end Olympic Peninsula coastal rivers hold sea-run Cutthroat, and by now they will be fat and sassy after a summer of feasting on saltwater forage. Getting back into the rivers during the October Caddis hatch means that they will be reckless about dry flies. 

   Oh yes! Here's some cool summer steelhead flies that my friend Leland Miyawaki ties and fishes with. You can connect with him at the Orvis Bellevue fly Shop.

Leland Miyawaki's "Phat Flies"

   September 24th- The New Moon


Reading the signs . . .

     As if fresh running rivers, mild days and crisp cool nights, October Caddis hatches and willing fish weren't enough for us, the coho salmon are coming home now too. And this weather is really going to spur them on as those rivers freshen up on higher flows. So for the next few weeks we will also be enjoying beach fishing with the increasing tidal energies of the waxing moon. The full moon in October is on the 8th, (and it will be a lunar eclipse event as well). I know that some people swear by them, yet I have never really followed the "Solunar fishing tables" with any serious intent. But when it comes to saltwater fishing it does pay to be aware of the moon phases as this drives the tides. Big tides, rising rivers, cooler autumn air rushing in, Oh man. It's hard to mourn the loss of summer sun and warmth with this much good fishing in the offing. Break out your sweaters and warm hats! I love the smell of cedar wood smoke in the cool evenings. . .

   To learn more about Puget Sound and Olympic Peninsula fly fishing call or write for more details. I would be happy to help you plan your Olympic Peninsula adventure.

 

Olympic Peninsula Fly Fishing Guide and Instructor

  I am guiding fly fishers on the Olympic Peninsula beaches, rivers and streams. We walk and wade, fly fishing for sea-run Coastal Cutthroat trout in freshwater and saltwater, and in the rivers for trout and summer steelhead. This is strictly catch and release, traditional fly fishing only. Lunch, snacks, soft beverages, and use of some equipment is included. Personalized and private fly fishing and fly casting instruction, and guided trips are available, for beginners through expert anglers. Public presentations, Naturalist guide for rowboat picnics, Tide Pool and river trail day trips. Please call, write or email for booking details.
  

Bob Triggs
Little Stone Flyfisher
P.O. Box 261
Port Townsend, WA
98368

Licensed Washington State Guide 
Certified Fly Casting Instructor
Trout Unlimited Aquatic Educator Award
U.S.C.G First Aid/CPR/BLS/AED/BBP/HIV Certified

Phone: 360-385-9618


Sunday, September 21, 2014

Guide's Day Off


Your Olympic Peninsula Fly Fishing Guide,
Catch & Release, Fly Fishing Only!

Guide's Day Off
    I count myself as lucky that sometimes the boundaries between my work and my play get diminished, blurred and indistinct. In the course of many seasons a guide might meet people from all over the world. Some of them will catch fish and some won't. Some will never come back. And a few might return each season. You do your best to help them, show them the water and you try to find the fish, you give them lots of support and encouragement. You try to teach them some things, and you share your water and experience. Some of these people become your friends. Andy has been putting up with me for years. This year Andy and I took a day off to be fishing buddies. It worked out perfectly. 

   
Andy plys the tides.



    Cool and cloudy, no wind, and a fog all morning into afternoon. And we were all alone on the beaches mid week.

Andy's beautiful Irish sea trout flies.

The Compost System of Fly Management:
I just keep adding new flies on top of the ones that are disintegrating in my box.

I got lucky first . . .
A nice autumn sea-run Cutthroat.
Break time on the beach.
Andy's Orvis Access switch rod and reel. Ready for coho!
Three casts into the afternoon and this happened.
.
A beautiful ocean bright coho!

Way to go Andy!
   
   This is one of the happiest aspects of being a guide- you meet some great people. And some of them end up being your friend, and your fishing buddy. Thanks for a great day Andy!

Late September Olympic Peninsula fly fishing update: 9/21/14

   The Olympic Peninsula rivers are still running very low. We have yet to get the kind of rain here that will turn it all on for autumn. The short term forecast ahead does indicate some rain. We'll just have to wait and see. And as I said last week, there are still plenty of great little spots to fish in the low water, and you wouldn't be putting the fish at risk. There are some bruising sea run cutthroat around now, and summer steelhead. And there's more to come. These fish will be holding in shaded waters, deeper pockets and pools, longer deeper glides, and below tributaries where there may be colder ground water upwelling into the main stem rivers. Deep, slow, dead-drifted soft hackle flies, caddis pupae and especially the dry flies- October Caddis, muddlers and Bill McMillan's Steelhead Caddis, skated and skittered across the surface, are all good patterns this time of year. Oh, And right now there are coho running the beaches just about everywhere. Decisions, decisions . . . 

   To learn more about Puget Sound and Olympic Peninsula fly fishing call or write for more details. I would be happy to help you plan your Olympic Peninsula adventure.

 

Olympic Peninsula Fly Fishing Guide and Instructor

  I am guiding fly fishers on the Olympic Peninsula beaches, rivers and streams. We walk and wade, fly fishing for sea-run Coastal Cutthroat trout in freshwater and saltwater, and in the rivers for trout and summer steelhead. This is strictly catch and release, traditional fly fishing only. Lunch, snacks, soft beverages, and use of some equipment is included. Personalized and private fly fishing and fly casting instruction, and guided trips are available, for beginners through expert anglers. Public presentations, Naturalist guide for rowboat picnics, Tide Pool and river trail day trips. Please call, write or email for booking details.
  

Bob Triggs
Little Stone Flyfisher
P.O. Box 261
Port Townsend, WA
98368

Licensed Washington State Guide 
Certified Fly Casting Instructor
Trout Unlimited Aquatic Educator Award
U.S.C.G First Aid/CPR/BLS/AED/BBP/HIV Certified

Phone: 360-385-9618



   

Monday, September 15, 2014

September High!



Your Olympic Peninsula fly fishing guide.
Catch & Release, Fly Fishing Only!


September High!


Late Bloomer.
   We have been riding the wave of an extended sunny and warm summer right into autumn. And one thing to remember about warm air, and especially as pertains to the Pacific Coastal climate, is that warm air contains more moisture. So this is building up with each warmer day. And the nights have been getting cooler. So eventually that moisture is going to start falling from the sky. It looks like that is coming later this week. And as much as I like living as though we were in an endless summer of blue skies and fair winds, sunscreen and straw hats, I am welcoming this shift into the annual rain cycle here. But don't break out your pumps and bailing buckets yet. We rarely get serious replenishing rains this early. That most likely happens in October. At this point, we need some serious rainfall. But every little bit helps.  

    The Olympic Peninsula rivers are running low and clear for the most part. But take heart- The rivers and fish are going to perk up with some rain. It looks like this rain will be coming in around the same time that we expect the October Caddis to begin hatching out in earnest. Cooler nights, shorter days, and a little sun mixed in. This is a nice way to segue into fall. So don't hesitate to explore these rivers and streams as they gradually come back to life. There are summer run steelhead in most of them now. And with a little rain a few more will be showing up this fall. We can have good dry fly fishing for summer steelhead and sea run Cutthroat trout in these rivers through October. I like my own October Caddis, steelhead Caddis fly, tied with Hoh River elk hair. 


Little Stone's Steelhead Caddis

     This year I am also going to be using Derek Young's great fly, The "Yak Caddis," with a little more regularity for Cutthroat and Steelhead on the rivers. Derek Young guides on the Yakima River and on some other very cool waters around the great American West. Derek was honored with the Orvis Guide Of The Year award a few years ago. This guy really knows his stuff. Check him out at his Emerging Rivers Guide Services .


Derek Young's great fly, The "Yak Caddis."
 www.orvis.com/p/yakcaddis/3r8x

     
     And if you simply must get out there on the Olympic Peninsula rivers now, low water be damned, Go ahead! You aren't getting any younger. And like I said, there are plenty of fish around now. You won't have to worry about any damaging warm water temperature issues either. 

    Please be aware that Olympic National Park has closed the Upper Hoh River, South Fork Hoh River, and it's tributaries to fishing for now, as they are trying to reduce impacts on the returning, spawning Chinook salmon. This is why I do not guide for those fish to begin with. They expect another low return / spawner escapement this year. Again.  www.nps.gov/olympic 


   I will also suggest that you bring along some Caddis Pupa flies. There will be countless caddis pupae, drifting in the currents, working their way to the surface now, and for the next two months. One of the really good ones for these waters, for trout and steelhead, is Skip Morris "Brick Back Caddis." And what you want to do is tie this fly onto a long fine leader, at least nine feet long, and using a floating line, drift this bad boy through those deeper slower holding lies, in the dark drop offs and ledges, and along the foamy seams. Skip is without a doubt one of the most talented and enthusiastic fly tying innovators out there today. There's an old saying: "Pretty is as pretty does." Skip's flies catch fish. Take a look at his website if you are interested in learning more about flies, and fly tying, and how to fish with them:
Skip Morris Fly Tying 


"Pretty is as pretty does"
Skip Morris "Brick Back Caddis."
www.skip-morris-fly-tying.com
   
On the saltchuck: 

     Oh how I hate to say "Things are heating up!" . . .But they are. We are catching some really nice wild sea-run Coastal Cutthroat trout from the beaches now. If you want  a solid chance at catching a trophy sea-run: Now is your time and this is your place. We usually have good fishing for these wild trout through October, and sometimes through November. We're also seeing more coho salmon coming through these waters. And anglers on most of the beaches around here are reporting improved fishing. Once the weather begins to change, everything gets moving. So should  you! 



Wild sea-run Coastal Cutthroat trout.
    To learn more about Puget Sound and Olympic Peninsula fly fishing call or write for more details. I would be happy to help you plan your Olympic Peninsula adventure.


Olympic Peninsula Fly Fishing Guide and Instructor

  I am guiding fly fishers on the Olympic Peninsula beaches, rivers and streams. We walk and wade, fly fishing for sea-run Coastal Cutthroat trout in freshwater and saltwater, and in the rivers for trout and summer steelhead. This is strictly catch and release, traditional fly fishing only. Lunch, snacks, soft beverages, and use of some equipment is included. Personalized and private fly fishing and fly casting instruction, and guided trips are available, for beginners through expert anglers. Public presentations, Naturalist guide for rowboat picnics, Tide Pool and river trail day trips. Please call, write or email for booking details.
  

Bob Triggs
Little Stone Flyfisher
P.O. Box 261
Port Townsend, WA
98368

Licensed Washington State Guide 
Certified Fly Casting Instructor
Trout Unlimited Aquatic Educator Award
U.S.C.G First Aid/CPR/BLS/AED/BBP/HIV Certified

Phone: 360-385-9618